Wednesday, 13 June 2018

Equitation science

I love this thought from Clinician, Chris Sorensen at the recent EC Convention (Can. Equestrian Team) “One of the most amazing things that you learn as you train with top people around the world is that almost all of them practice basics every day. We all think that these famous riders are going to teach us magical tricks that are eluding us, but the fact of the matter is that riding is a very difficult sport, but it’s not that complicated.”
Agreed! I think of riding as less like magic and more like a fascinating science.
                                                             
If “equestrian science” can be distilled to a theory, I’m going to give it a try!
Love of learning + HOW to apply physical aids + understanding WHY the aids work + applying those skills skillfully and automatically = happy horse.
 Tested in the lab of the show ring before experimenting in the show ring!

Wednesday, 6 June 2018

Jumping horses as little as possible?

On the benefits of installing lateral “buttons “ on competitive horses, while “jumping as little as possible.”

“I do lots of flat work. A work a lot of poles on the ground to replicate the same kind of training that’s required for the course, but over a rail on the ground instead of having a jumping effort. It just minimizes the impact on the horse. I have a dressage trainer who works with me full-time… [lateral movements ] make my horses really in tune with my aids. They become really responsive off the legs, and that’s useful for what we do.” U.S Olympian show jumper, Kent Farrington.
Jumping is fun. Fundamentals…less so. I know that makes me a “less fun” coach at times, but being on course or in a crowded warm-up ring on a distracted horse without fundamentals is about as fun as being on highway 401 without steering!